Select the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for

MTREP Book Club - November 28, 2017
Nov
28
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - November 28, 2017

All the Real Indians Died Off

By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker

"All the Real Indians Died Off" unpacks the twenty-one most common myths and misconceptions about Native Americans

In this enlightening book, scholars and activists Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture and history that have misinformed generations. Tracing how these ideas evolved, and drawing from history, the authors disrupt long-held and enduring myths such as:

“Columbus Discovered America”
“Thanksgiving Proves the Indians Welcomed Pilgrims”
“Indians Were Savage and Warlike”
“Europeans Brought Civilization to Backward Indians”
“The United States Did Not Have a Policy of Genocide”
“Sports Mascots Honor Native Americans”
“Most Indians Are on Government Welfare”
“Indian Casinos Make Them All Rich”
“Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcohol”

Each chapter deftly shows how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of a settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land and tied to narratives of erasure and disappearance. Accessibly written and revelatory, “All the Real Indians Died Off” challenges readers to rethink what they have been taught about Native Americans and history.

View this one-hour YouTube video with the authors filmed in Washington D.C. late December 2016

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - October 24, 2017
Oct
24
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - October 24, 2017

Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

By Carolyn Finney, PhD

Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism? In this thought-provoking study, Carolyn Finney looks beyond the discourse of the environmental justice movement to examine how the natural environment has been understood, commodified, and represented by both white and black Americans. Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces. 

Drawing on a variety of sources from film, literature, and popular culture, and analyzing different historical moments, including the establishment of the Wilderness Act in 1964 and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Finney reveals the perceived and real ways in which nature and the environment are racialized in America. Looking toward the future, she also highlights the work of African Americans who are opening doors to greater participation in environmental and conservation concerns.

The Montana State University Wallace Stegner Lecture Series is proud to present Dr. Carolyn Finney as the Fall 2017 Stegner Lecturer. Dr. Finney will speak on "The Long Way Home: All Things Green and the Possibility of Us." The event at The Ellen Theatre in Bozeman is free and open to the public; a reception will follow the lecture. Entrace is free but seats must be secured in advance at this link.

The Montana State University Wallace Stegner Lecture Series is proud to present Dr. Carolyn Finney as the Fall 2017 Stegner Lecturer. Dr. Finney will speak on "The Long Way Home: All Things Green and the Possibility of Us." The event at The Ellen Theatre in Bozeman is free and open to the public; a reception will follow the lecture. Entrace is free but seats must be secured in advance at this link.

Dr. Carolyn Finney talks about her book—Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors. in this presentation for WBGH (Boston) in April 2015. Her work bridges the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography. She argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces.

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use
Oct
7
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use

This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged and marginalized peoples.

You will gain awareness of key terms, and history, and your cultural lens. You'll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry, and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

WHEN |

Saturday, October 7, 2017

9:00am - 3:00pm

WHERE |

C'mon Inn

6139 E Valley Center Rd

Bozeman, MT

COST |

$56.00 provided

Bring your own lunch, snacks provided

One full and one half scholarship available

Limited to 20 people

 

Email: info@themtrep.org to enroll

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - September 26, 2017
Sep
26
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - September 26, 2017

  • Gallatin Valley Land Trust - Conference Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

THE HATE YOU GIVE

By Angie Thomas

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1gNYFka1-s&t=1464s

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

-description courtesy of Amazon.com

View Event →
Race in Montana - A Community Forum
Sep
15
8:15 AM08:15

Race in Montana - A Community Forum

The Montana Racial Equity Project (MTREP) invites you to a free and open forum to explore many of the facets of racial equity and justice in Montana.

Experts and community members will participate as panelists. Following each panel, the audience is encouraged to engage in community dialogue and discuss possible solutions to problematic issues raised. 
We coexist with thousands of different backgrounds, heritages, cultures, and mindsets. Being able to see into the lives of those who are different from us empowers our community to be more inclusive and supportive towards one another. MTREP's Race in Montana Community Forum does just that, by promoting productive conversation and opening individual's minds to the (often harsh) realities of their neighbors and communities.

This Forum is funded in part by a grant from Humanities Montana.

Schedule (subject to change)
8:15am - 8:45am Registration Open - Bozeman Public Library

  • 8:45 - 9am: Greeting/Acknowledgements
  • 9-9:45: 1st panel Sovereign Nations yet Wards of the Government - Panelists: Meg Singer, Indigenous Justice Outreach Coordinator, ACLU-MT; Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University; Moderator, Marci McLean - Pollock, Executive Director, Western Native Voice and Board Member of MTREP
  • 10-10:45: 2nd panel Unpacking Microaggressions - Panelists: Asst. Prof. Anna Elliott, Counseling Department, Montana State University; Kristin Barker, co-founder, White Awake; Moderator, Asst. Prof. Bryce Hughes, Education Dept., Montana State University
  • 11-11:45: 3rd panel Cultural Appropriation - Panelists: Meg Singer, Indigenous Justice Outreach Coordinator, ACLU-MT; Paul S. John, Board Chair of MTREP, Aspen Hougen, Volunteer and Co-Instructor of Dismantling Hatred Workshop (MTREP); Moderator, Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University

11:50 to 12:50pm Lunch on own
12:50pm Doors open/Registration, Bozeman Public Library

  • 1-1:45: 4th panel Racial & Cultural Bias in Marketing & Advertising (incl ableism) - Panelists: LaNada Peppers, Staff Writer at Montana Native News Project, Assoc. Prof. Meta Newhouse, Montana State University School of Art and Founding Director of DSEL (the Design Sandbox of Engaged Learning), Vasu Sojitra, Adaptive Sports Director, Eagle Mount and extreme athlete; Moderator: Judith Heilman, Executive Director of MTREP
  • 2-245: 5th panel White Privilege and White Fragility - Panelists: Kristin Barker, Co-Founder of White Awake; Sara Rushing, PhD, Political Science Dept at Montana State University; Moderator, Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University
  • 3-3:45: 6th panel Sit Down! Guidance for White Activists - Panelists: The Board of The Montana Racial Equity Project; Moderator, Sara Rushing, PhD, Political Science Dept at Montana State University
  • 4pm-4:30pm: 7th panel Stand up! Tips for Racial Justice/ Community Organizing - Panelists: SK Rossi, Advocacy and Policy Director, ACLU-Montana; Sara Howell, Exec. Director, Montana Women Vote; Moderator: Paul S. John, Board President, MTREP
  • 4:30-4:45pm Reflections on the day

4:45pm to 7pm Dinner on own
7pm Doors open at The Hager Auditorium, Museum of the Rockies

  • 7:30-9:00 "The Bumpy Road to a Positive White Identity" followed by a moderated Q & A. - Panelists: Kristin Barker, co-founder, White Awake; Judith Heilman, Exec. Director, The Montana Racial Equity Project; Moderator, Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University.

As our culture confronts our nation’s legacy of racism and the ways it persists, it’s incumbent upon those who identify as white to understand racial dynamics and be open to others’ perspectives. Yet often we feel attacked and blamed, as if others see us as guilty or privileged in ways we aren’t or can’t relate to. 

In this compelling evening, Kristin Barker, co-founder of White Awake (joined by Judith Heilman, Exec Dir of The Montana Racial Equity Project,) will present the common reactions and misgivings that white people have about racial equity and normalize the sometimes painful process of examining what it means for us. 

Our murky, unexplored feelings about being white often create a nervousness and hesitancy to speak and connect across racial lines. Many of us:
• Feel like we’re walking on egg shells, afraid we will say “the wrong thing” 
• Fear that we’ll unintentionally hurt someone and be seen as “racist”
• Feel defensive about what “White Privilege” might mean
• Support “Black Lives Matter” in theory but fear it in practice
• Sense that racial equity means that something is being taken away from “us”
• Feel bad about the legacy of racism, but don’t feel we can do anything about it
• Feel somehow guilty by association for something (our skin) over which we had no control
• Feel like there are emerging double standards and “reverse racism”

Working with these common reactions to the emerging racial dialogue is an important process of growth in understanding, in increasing our ability to address issues of race without shame, anger, undue guilt or defensiveness.

The Library is handicapped accessible, is equipped with bathrooms for all and free wi-fi, and has an on-site coffee shop. The Hager Auditorium is also handicapped accessible.

View Event →
Just Mercy - Montana
Aug
30
11:30 AM11:30

Just Mercy - Montana

The Montana Racial Equity Project in partnership with the Bozeman Public Library presents an open forum to discuss issues featured in the work of Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative, and author of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. The issues are: Aiding the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned, specifically – the elimination of excessive and unfair sentencing, the exoneration of innocent death row prisoners, elimination of the abuse of the incarcerated and the mentally ill and aiding children prosecuted as adults.

| WHO |
Judith Heilman - Executive Director, Montana Racial Equity Project
Caitlin Borgmann – Executive Director, ACLU Montana
Rabbi Ed Stafman - former Defense Attorney
Larry Mansch - Legal and Clinic Director, The Montana Innocence Project
Moderator: Professor Franke Wilmer, Department Chair, Political Science, Montana State University

| WHERE |
Bozeman Public Library Large Community Meeting Room, 626 E. Main St., Bozeman, MT 59715

| WHEN |
Wednesday, August 30th
Doors open 11:00am, event concludes 1:30pm

| COST |
Free to the public

17.08.30 Just Mercy-Montana flyer, FINAL.jpg
View Event →
MTREP Book Club - August 29, 2017
Aug
29
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - August 29, 2017

JUST MERCY

By Bryan Stevenson (MSU Convocation Speaker, 2017)

#1 New York Times Bestseller | Named one of the Best Books of the Year by The New York Times • The Washington Post • The Boston Globe • The Seattle Times • Esquire • Time

A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice—from one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time
 
Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.
 
Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.

- Description courtesy of Amazon.com

Check out this 38 minute conversation with Mr. Stevenson on NPR's Fresh Air.

Also view this interview with Mr. Stevenson on August 15, 2017 regarding the Charlottesville violence, courtesy of CNN.

View Event →
Peace Through Diversity
Jul
29
10:00 AM10:00

Peace Through Diversity

Understand how awareness of diversity can create a culture of peace and bring greater harmony to our community and the world.

Shadmani M. Amin -- Muslim Community

Karen DeCotis -- Bozeman Dharma Center

Karen deVries, PhD  -- Gender Studies

Carly Siefert -- The Montana Racial Equity Project

Glover Wagner -- Pilgrim Congregational Church

Franke Wilmer -- Member, Temple Beth Shalom

Each speaker will give a 5 minute talk about what peace means to them and how it can be achieved.

Each talk will be followed by 8 minutes of silent contemplation of the words just heard and what they mean to you.

Refresh Your Mind.     Open Your Heart.     Welcome Diversity.

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - July 25, 2017
Jul
25
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - July 25, 2017

SIGNS PRECEDING THE END OF THE WORLD

By Yuri Herrrra, translated into English by Lisa Dillman

Signs Preceding the End of the World is one of the most arresting novels to be published in Spanish in the last ten years. Yuri Herrera does not simply write about the border between Mexico and the United States and those who cross it. He explores the crossings and translations people make in their minds and language as they move from one country to another, especially when there’s no going back.

Traversing this lonely territory is Makina, a young woman who knows only too well how to survive in a violent, macho world. Leaving behind her life in Mexico to search for her brother, she is smuggled into the USA carrying a pair of secret messages – one from her mother and one from the Mexican underworld.

Text courtesy of Amazon.com

NOTE: This book discussion will be led by Dr. Sara Rushing, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Montana State University.

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - June 27, 2017
Jun
27
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - June 27, 2017

TEARS WE CANNOT STOP: A Sermon to White America

by Michael Eric Dyson

“One of the most frank and searing discussions on race ... a deeply serious, urgent book, which should take its place in the tradition of Baldwin's The Fire Next Time and King's Why We Can't Wait." ―The New York Times Book Review

Toni Morrison hails Tears We Cannot Stop as "Elegantly written and powerful in several areas: moving personal recollections; profound cultural analysis; and guidance for moral redemption. A work to relish." 

Stephen King says: "Here’s a sermon that’s as fierce as it is lucid…If you’re black, you’ll feel a spark of recognition in every paragraph. If you’re white, Dyson tells you what you need to know―what this white man needed to know, at least. This is a major achievement. I read it and said amen."

Short, emotional, literary, powerful―Tears We Cannot Stop is the book that all Americans who care about the current and long-burning crisis in race relations will want to read.

As the country grapples with racist division at a level not seen since the 1960s, one man's voice soars above the rest with conviction and compassion. In his 2016 New York Times op-ed piece "Death in Black and White," Michael Eric Dyson moved a nation. Now he continues to speak out in Tears We Cannot Stop―a provocative and deeply personal call for change. Dyson argues that if we are to make real racial progress we must face difficult truths, including being honest about how black grievance has been ignored, dismissed, or discounted.

"The time is at hand for reckoning with the past, recognizing the truth of the present, and moving together to redeem the nation for our future. If we don't act now, if you don't address race immediately, there very well may be no future."

~ Descripition courtesy Amazon.com

View Event →
PIE & ICE CREAM FUNDRAISER!
Jun
7
6:30 PM18:30

PIE & ICE CREAM FUNDRAISER!

Join us in Bozeman to celebrate and support Montana Human Rights Network and The Montana Racial Equity Project! 

Address is not publicly posted. Please RSVP to kylie@mhrn for event address.

Come hear about the work of each organization, enjoy pie and home-made gourmet ice cream, and make a donation to support two great organizations working to promote human rights and racial equity in Montana.

If you can’t make it to this event but would like to make a donation to support The Montana Racial Equity Project, please go to our homepage (the Donate button is on the top left of our home page) or send a check to: PO Box 11885, Bozeman, MT 59719. Likewise, donations to the Montana Human Rights Network can be made by visiting the network's website or mailing donations to: PO Box 1509, Helena, MT 59624.

Thank you!

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Jun
3
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged and marginalized peoples.

You will gain awareness of key terms, and history, and your cultural lens. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

  • Bring Your Own Lunch. Drinks, including coffee and herbal teas will be provided.
  • The workshop will be conducted in the classroom of Shining Mountains Lutheran Church.

NOTE: The Montana Racial Equity Project is not affiliated with Shining Mountains Lutheran Church or any other religious institution.

Please complete the registration form (below) and mail it back to us with your payment (address at the bottom of the form) or scan and email it back to us at info@themtrep.org. Payment may be made by using our PayPal DONATE button at the top left of our home page.

Thank you!

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - May 30
May
30
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - May 30

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis

by J.D. Vance

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility.

But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

View Event →
HATE FREE Bo-ZONE Press Conference
May
11
5:00 PM17:00

HATE FREE Bo-ZONE Press Conference

May 10, 2017

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

***PRESS CONFERENCE***

DATE: May 11, 2017, Thursday

TIME: 5:00 PM to 5:15 PM

LOCATION: Soroptimist Park (Main St. and Rouse Ave), Bozeman

 

Honored and respected city and county officials and representatives of local religious communities and non-profit social justice organizations will speak to the press and the public on Thursday, May 11 at 5pm in Soroptimist Park on Main Street at Rouse Avenue, Bozeman, Montana.

 

The morning of Sunday, May 7, 2017, many Bozeman residents were shocked and appalled to find anti-Semitic hate flyers on their doorsteps. Many have been confused and angry about this anonymous “literature” drop and cowardly action. The following speakers will provide information and clarity for the Bozeman community:

 

Hosts: Judith Heilman, The Montana Racial Equity Project & Travis McAdam, Montana Human Rights Network

 

Speakers:

·         Mayor Carson Taylor, City of Bozeman

·         Chief Steve Crawford, Bozeman Police Department

·         Rabbi Ed Stafman, Congregation Beth Shalom

·         Sheriff Brian Gootkin, Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office

·         Rabbi Chaim Bruk, Chabad Lubavitch of Montana

·         Rev. Denise Rogers, Montana Hate Free Zone

·         Dr. Ahmed Al-Kaisy, on behalf of Bozeman’s Muslim Community

·         Rev. Jody McDevitt, Gallatin Valley Interfaith Association

 

Contacts:

Judith Heilman, The Montana Racial Equity Project, info@themtrep.org

Travis McAdam, Montana Human Rights Network, travis@mhrn.org

Rabbi Ed Stafman, Congregation Beth Shalom, bozemanrabbi@gmail.com

Mayor Carson Taylor, City of Bozeman, ctaylor@bozeman.net

Chief Steve Crawford, Bozeman Police Department, scrawford@bozeman.net  

 

###

View Event →
Bozeman "Open To All" Business Initiative
May
10
6:30 PM18:30

Bozeman "Open To All" Business Initiative

The Montana Racial Equity Project, in collaboration with Bridgercare, is launching the PRIDE Foundation Open to All business initiative in Bozeman on May 10, 2017.

The Open To All Business Initiative is a multi-faceted, business-driven project. The initiative aims to build visibility for the LGBTQ community to both patrons and employees who may be living and visiting the community.  It seeks to elevate those businesses that support the LGBTQ community, and give businesses an opportunity to declare their support while signifying to LGBTQ people which businesses support their full humanity with a decal in the window. This initiative is one opportunity for the local business community to help shift cultural norms and increase safe and affirming community spaces where LGBTQ people work, visit and recreate.

We’d like to build the network of supportive businesses and organizations to talk about inclusive policies such as comprehensive and inclusive non-discrimination policies for employees, the potential for gender-neutral facilities for both patrons and employees, broader definitions for family leave and benefit policies and building a network of businesses willing to sign on to potential policy changes.

Pledge forms and decals will be available at launch events and upon request. 

We invite all persons in Gallatin Valley who want to volunteer and be trained to canvass for this initiative to a meeting on May 10, 2017 at 6:30-8 pm at the Bozeman Public Library Small Conference Room.

Click here to register a business.

View Event →
April 25 Book Club - Muslim Girl - A Coming Of Age
Apr
25
7:30 PM19:30

April 25 Book Club - Muslim Girl - A Coming Of Age

by Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, the founder of MuslimGirl.com

The reading and discussion of this book is timed to coordinate with the lecture on April 26 by Dr. Ambrin Masood, " Cultural Diversity and Muslims in America."

This book is a harrowing and candid memoir about coming of age as a Muslim American in the wake of 9/11, during the never-ending war on terror, and through the Trump era of casual racism.

At nine years old, Amani Al-Khatahtbeh watched from her home in New Jersey as two planes crashed into the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. That same year, she heard her first racial slur. At age eleven, when the United States had begun to invade Iraq and the television was flooded with anti-Muslim commentary, Amani felt overwhelmed with feelings of intense alienation from American society. At thirteen, her family took a trip to her father’s native homeland of Jordan, and Amani experienced firsthand a culture built on pure religion, not Islamic stereotypes.

Inspired by her trip and after years of feeling like her voice as a Muslim woman was marginalized and neglected during a time when all the media could talk about was, ironically, Muslim women, Amani created a website called MuslimGirl. As the editor-in-chief, she put together a team of Muslim women and started a life dedicated to activism.

This is the extraordinary account of Amani’s journey through adolescence as a Muslim girl, from the Islamophobia she’s faced on a daily basis, to the website she launched that became a cultural phenomenon, to the nation’s political climate in the 2016 election cycle with Donald Trump as the Republican nominee. While dispelling the myth that a headscarf makes you a walking target for terrorism, she shares both her own personal accounts and anecdotes from the “sisterhood” of writers that serve as her editorial team at MuslimGirl. Amani’s honest, urgent message is fresh, timely, and a deeply necessary counterpoint to the current rhetoric about the Middle East.

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - April 11
Apr
11
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - April 11

Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race

by Margot Lee Shetterly

To get to the Conference Room for our Book Club Meeting: Park in the parking lot of the Gallatin Valley Land Trust and walk along the walkway that borders the Bozeman Library parking lot. Go to the back door of the Gallatin Valley Land Trust offices. The conference room will be down the hall on your left.
---------------------
Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.
Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.
Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.
Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.

Link to film trailer and interview with the author, Margot Lee Shetterly, Author, Hidden Figures: The American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44YvoJPql68

 

View Event →
Profiles of  African American  Montanans
Apr
4
6:30 PM18:30

Profiles of African American Montanans

with Ellen Baumler, author and interpretive historian, Montana Historical Society

African Americans, small in numbers in Montana, nevertheless have a rich and varied history in this state that has been largely unexplored. They came with the very first waves of frontier settlers seeking new opportunities. This compelling program chronicles the lives and contributions of more than 20 African American families and individuals through historic photographs, headlines, art, and architecture.

Crystal Bauer Alegria, of the The Extreme History Project, will also present “African Americans in Bozeman"

The program touches upon the legacy of slavery, the segregation and subsequent integration of Montana schools, other laws relating to minorities, and African American culture in Montana. With a knack for making history personal, Baumler explores the stories, struggles, and accomplishments of some of Montana’s African Americans in Montana.

This program is presented with the assistance of grant funding from Humanities Montana.

Left to right, Ellen Baumler and Crystal Alegria

Left to right, Ellen Baumler and Crystal Alegria

View Event →
Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy
Apr
2
4:30 PM16:30

Immigration and Refugee Law and Policy

  • The Emerson Center for the Arts & Culture (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Join us for a Community Conversation with Shahid Haque-Hausrath, an immigration lawyer, founder and president of the Montana Immigrant Justice Alliance, and law instructor at the University of Montana. 

Shahid Haque-Hausrath

Shahid Haque-Hausrath

Mr. Haque-Hausrath, an expert on immigration and refugee law and policy, will provide us with a clear picture on the subject and discuss the national and state policies which affect us here in Montana. We'll have opportunity for questions and answers after the presentation.

Mr. Haque-Hausrath dedicates his practice to helping immigrants obtain legal status in the United States and pursue all that the country has to offer. He represents well over a thousand immigrants and their families all across Montana, and has been in contact with over a thousand other immigrants in Montana through his advocacy efforts. He has internalized their stories, understands their feelings and anxieties, and is one of the few people in Montana who has a broad and clear picture of the diverse immigrant communities throughout Montana, from Glacier to Yellowstone—and in all the small communities along the way.

This event is sponsored in part by:

HM header_logo.png

Photographs from the lecture.

View Event →
March 28 Book Club - Freedom Is A Constant Struggle
Mar
28
7:30 PM19:30

March 28 Book Club - Freedom Is A Constant Struggle

by Angela Y. Davis

In these newly collected essays, interviews, and speeches, world-renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world.

Reflecting on the importance of black feminism, intersectionality, and prison abolitionism for today's struggles, Davis discusses the legacies of previous liberation struggles, from the Black Freedom Movement to the South African anti-Apartheid movement. She highlights connections and analyzes today's struggles against state terror, from Ferguson to Palestine.

Facing a world of outrageous injustice, Davis challenges us to imagine and build the movement for human liberation. And in doing so, she reminds us that "Freedom is a constant struggle."

We are pleased have this book discussion led by Dr. Karen deVries of Montana State University.

View Event →
Dismantling Hate - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Mar
11
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hate - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards disadvantaged and marginalized peoples. 

You will gain awareness of key definitions and history and also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

Class size limited to 15 people. Through specific and generous volunteer donations, scholarships - one full and one one-half - are available for those in need. Email us at info@themtrep.org about this. Email us at info@themtrep.org for availability

Go to the "Donations" link at the top left of our Home Page to submit your payment or mail a check along with your completed registration form to:  The Montana Racial Equity Project, PO Box 11885, Bozeman, MT 59719-1885

Coffee, tea, water, snacks and a small lunch provided.

Download and print this registration form, fill it out mail it to us at the address on the form. Alternatively, you may scan and email your completed form to info@themtrep.org but do mail your check to to us if that is your desired form of payment. Thank you!

Download and print this registration form, fill it out mail it to us at the address on the form. Alternatively, you may scan and email your completed form to info@themtrep.org but do mail your check to to us if that is your desired form of payment. Thank you!

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - February
Feb
28
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - February

Small Great Things

by Jodi Picoult

Ruth Jefferson is a labor and delivery nurse at a Connecticut hospital with more than twenty years’ experience. During her shift, Ruth begins a routine checkup on a newborn, only to be told a few minutes later that she’s been reassigned to another patient. The parents are white supremacists and don’t want Ruth, who is African American, to touch their child. The hospital complies with their request, but the next day, the baby goes into cardiac distress while Ruth is alone in the nursery. Does she obey orders or does she intervene?

Ruth hesitates before performing CPR and, as a result, is charged with a serious crime. Kennedy McQuarrie, a white public defender, takes her case but gives unexpected advice: Kennedy insists that mentioning race in the courtroom is not a winning strategy. Conflicted by Kennedy’s counsel, Ruth tries to keep life as normal as possible for her family—especially her teenage son—as the case becomes a media sensation. As the trial moves forward, Ruth and Kennedy must gain each other’s trust, and come to see that what they’ve been taught their whole lives about others—and themselves—might be wrong.

With incredible empathy, intelligence, and candor, Jodi Picoult tackles race, privilege, prejudice, justice, and compassion—and doesn’t offer easy answers. Small Great Things is a remarkable achievement from a writer at the top of her game.

View Event →
Feb
25
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hate: Building Skills for an Inclusive Community

Many of us are wondering what we can do to build a more inclusive community in this new reality. How can we confront and interrupt oppression and mistreatment when we see it? How can we work together to create spaces where everyone can be safe?

Facilitated by The Montana Racial Equity Project & EmpowerMT this session will enable you to develop skills and strategies to:

· identify our own cultural lenses, and the cultural lenses of others.

· build a shared language and foundation of understanding about oppression and its impact on fellow community members.

· develop skills for interrupting oppression when we see it in our communities.

6 Hour Training: $30 to $80 Sliding Scale Registration - Lunch Included

(scholarships available)

More information and registration at:

EmpowerMT

The Montana Racial Equity Project

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use
Jan
16
8:00 AM08:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project and Hopa Mountain Co-present this workshop which will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards disadvantaged and marginalized peoples. 
You will gain awareness of key definitions and history and also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

Class size limited to 20 people.
Cost is $40 per person or $20 per student
**Contact Hopa Mountain if you need a partial or full scholarship to attend: 586-2455.

Pre-registration is required. Please download the registration form to pay by check. Alternatively, one may pay via PayPal using the DONATION button at the top left on our Home Page.

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use
Dec
10
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project and Hopa Mountain co-present this workshop which will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards disadvantaged and marginalized peoples. 

You will gain awareness of key definitions and history and also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

Class size limited to 20 people.
Cost is $40 per person or $20 per student
**Contact Hopa Mountain if you need a partial or full scholarship to attend: 586-2455.

Pre-registration is required. Please download the registration form to pay by check. Alternatively, one may pay via PayPal at the DONATION link at the top left of our home page.

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use
Dec
6
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project and Hopa Mountain co-present this workshop which will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards disadvantaged and marginalized peoples. 
You will gain awareness of key definitions and history and also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

Class size limited to 20 people.
Cost is $40 per person or $20 per student
**Contact Hopa Mountain if you need a partial or full scholarship to attend: 586-2455.

Pre-registration is required. Please download the registration form to pay by check. Alternatively, one may pay via PayPal using the DONATION button at the top left of our Home Page.

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - November
Nov
29
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - November

Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America

By Eduardo Bonilla-Silva

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva’s acclaimed Racism without Racists: Color-Blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America, (384 pp) documents how, beneath our contemporary conversation about race, lies a full-blown arsenal of arguments, phrases, and stories that whites use to account for—and ultimately justify—racial inequalities. This provocative book explodes the belief that America is now a color-blind society.

The fourth edition adds a chapter on what Bonilla-Silva calls "the new racism," which provides the essential foundation to explore issues of race and ethnicity in more depth. This edition also updates Bonilla-Silva’s assessment of race in America after President Barack Obama’s re-election. Obama’s presidency, Bonilla-Silva argues, does not represent a sea change in race relations, but rather embodies disturbing racial trends of the past.

In this fourth edition, Racism without Racists will continue to challenge readers and stimulate discussion about the state of race in America today.

Eduardo Bonilla-Silva is a Professor of Sociology at Duke University. Bonilla-Silva speaks widely on race and ethnic matters nationwide. He has published four books and says this about himself: "I am trained in class analysis, political sociology, and sociology of development (globalization). However, my work in the last 20 years has been in the area of race. I have published on racial theory, race and methodology, color-blind racism, the idea that race stratification in the USA is becoming Latin America-like, racial grammar, HWCUs, race and human rights, race and citizenship, whiteness, and the Obama phenomenon among other things. In all my work, I contend that racism is fundamentally about "racial domination," hence, racism is a collective and structural phenomenon in society. "

View Event →
How to Talk to your Kids About Race
Nov
28
9:30 AM09:30

How to Talk to your Kids About Race

We are in tough times. The expression of hatred and vitriol towards persons of color have been increasing in frequency and intensity. Our children are witnesses, some are victims and some are spreading it. At the root of it all is a lack of understanding about race, racism, bigotry, and prejudice. How can you, as a parent or caregiver, educate your kids about race?

Join us in the Large Community Room of the Bozeman Public Library for a FREE workshop on November 28th to learn and discuss skills on teaching your kids about race.

Three different sessions are provided in order to accommodate your schedule:

9:30AM - 12:00PM or

12:30PM - 3:00PM or

7:30PM - 9:30PM (this session may run later)

Bring a journal if you can.      

It is best to not bring kids

View Event →
Montana Stands With Standing Rock
Oct
29
12:00 PM12:00

Montana Stands With Standing Rock

BLESSING OF THE WATER at the Headwaters of the Missouri River.
As Montanans, we are responsible for keeping our living waters clean and healthy for all life. That includes for all life downstream from rivers, streams, and creeks. Water IS life! The Missouri River, one of the longest rivers in the United States, originates right here in Three Forks, Montana - only 1/2 hour west of Bozeman. Please join us for a Blessing Ceremony and Pot Luck Feed afterwards. 

Meet at the BOAT LAUNCH for the Ceremony. The potluck feed will begin immediately afterwards at the picnic grounds along the Gallatin River only .2 mile walk or drive from the boat launch.

Let us know if your organization would like to be a sponsor or partner and we’ll add your name and logo to our event and flyer! Contact us at info@themtrep.org

Please bring something to eat or drink to share and some disposable utensils, plates, cups, or bowls if you can.

Partners - The American Civil Liberties Union - Montana is our primary partner.

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - October
Oct
25
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - October

  • Cold Smoke Coffeehouse, Conference Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Like A Loaded Weapon - The Rehnquist Courts, Indian Rights, and the Legal History of Racism in America

by Robert A. Williams, Jr.

Robert A. Williams Jr. boldly exposes the ongoing legal force of the racist language directed at Indians in American society. Fueled by well-known negative racial stereotypes of Indian savagery and cultural inferiority, this language, Williams contends, has functioned “like a loaded weapon” in the Supreme Court’s Indian law decisions. 


Beginning with Chief Justice John Marshall’s foundational opinions in the early nineteenth century and continuing today in the judgments of the Rehnquist Court, Williams shows how undeniably racist language and precedent are still used in Indian law to justify the denial of important rights of property, self-government, and cultural survival to Indians. Building on the insights of Malcolm X, Thurgood Marshall, and Frantz Fanon, Williams argues that racist language has been employed by the courts to legalize a uniquely American form of racial dictatorship over Indian tribes by the U.S. government. 


Williams concludes with a revolutionary proposal for reimagining the rights of American Indians in international law, as well as strategies for compelling the current Supreme Court to confront the racist origins of Indian law and for challenging bigoted ways of talking, thinking, and writing about American Indians.

 

 

View Event →