Select the maximum amount you want to pay each month
$ USD
Sign up for
Appearance and Book-signing - Ijeoma Oluo
Sep
19
6:30 PM18:30

Appearance and Book-signing - Ijeoma Oluo

The Montana Racial Equity Project 3rd Annual Community Forum, THE TANGLED WEB - Race, Poverty, and Prejudice, will kick off with a Keynote by Ijeoma Oluo, author of So You Want to Talk About Race. 

In this New York Times bestseller, Ijeoma Oluo explores the complex reality of today's racial landscape--from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement--offering straightforward clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide.

In So You Want to Talk About Race, Editor at Large of The Establishment Ijeoma Oluo offers a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.

Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned and crystalize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. Her writing brings to mind voices like Ta-Nehisi Coates, Roxane Gay, Jessica Valenti in Full Frontal Feminism, and a young Gloria Naylor, particularly in Naylor's seminal essay "The Meaning of a Word."

ASL Interpretation: Please let your Deaf/hard-of-hearing family and friends know! There will be reserved seating in the front row for persons needing ASL interpretation.

Doors to the Keynote will open at 6:00 PM; the event begins at 6:30 PM and will run for one hour and twenty minutes followed by a book signing at 8:00 PM. Tickets can be purchased on Eventbrite at this link.

Panels for THE TANGLED WEB - Race, Poverty, and Prejudice, will begin the next morning, Sep. 20 at 8:00 AM at the same venue, the Holiday Inn. The daytime forum is free to the public courtesy of a grant from Humanities Montana. See our Event for Sep. 20 for details. A block of discounted hotel rooms will open up by Sep. 5 if not earlier.

PLEASE NOTE: The Montana Racial Equity Project entered into contracts for this event before realizing that this Keynote is on Yom Kippur. We sincerely regret our error and deeply apologize to those who cannot come hear Ms. Oluo speak because of this serious conflict. Such an egregious oversight will not happen again.

ACCESSIBILITY:

ASL Interpretation: Please let your Deaf/hard-of-hearing family and friends know! There will be reserved seating in the front row for persons needing ASL interpretation.

Wheelchair: Marked, accessible parking is close to the front entrance of the hotel. There are no stairs to negotiate. Doors to the hotel must be pushed open. All rooms are accessible including the book signing area in the hotel lobby (there is a ramp for wheelchairs.)

Thank you to our co-sponsors, the Montana State University College of Education, Health, and Human Development, Pride Foundation, Sierra Club, Townshend's Bozeman Teahouse, the Montana State University Department of Political Science, and the Montana State University Allen Yarnell Center for Student Success for helping to make this evening possible.

View Event →
OUR TANGLED WEB - Race, Poverty, and Prejudice
Sep
20
8:00 AM08:00

OUR TANGLED WEB - Race, Poverty, and Prejudice

Join us for "OUR TANGLED WEB - Race, Poverty, and Prejudice," our 3rd annual Community Forum!

The Forum will kick off with Keynote the evening of Sep. 19 by Ijeoma Oluo, best selling author of, "So You Want to Talk About Race." Tickets will be sold for the keynote - see our accompanying event for this special evening.
------------
The following day, September 20th, at the same venue, OUR TANGLED WEB pulls together an important group of topics and panelists that will explore the complex intersection of race, poverty, and prejudice in terms of history and current day effects, and hope for our future.

This portion of our Forum is free-to-the-public. 

SCHEDULE for Sep. 20:
8:00 AM - Doors open for check-in and seating

8:20 AM - Welcome

8:30 AM—10:00 AM: History of Economic Discrimination and Current Day Effects, by Meg Singer, ACLU-MT; Kaleigh Mency, AmeriCorps VISTA/MTREP; Angelina Gonzalez-Aller, PhD Candidate University of New Mexico

10:15 AM—11:45 AM:  From Poverty to Prison, by SK Rossi, J.D. , ACLU of Montana

11:45 AM—12:45 PM:  Lunch on own

12:45 PM—2:15 PM: Bias Affecting Trans Montanans and How to Be Proactive, hosted by Pride Foundation

2:30 PM—4:00 PM:  Diversity in the Outdoors, by Earthtone OutsideMT

4:15 PM—5:45 PM:  Racial Disparities in Health Care, by Asst. Prof. Vanessa Simonds, ScD, Montana State University; Judith Heilman, The Montana Racial Equity Project.

5:45 PM—6:00 PM:  CLOSING

OUR TANGLED WEB is made possible in part by a grant from Humanities Montana and sponsorships from Pride Foundation, Sierra Club, Montana State University College of Education, Health, and Human Development, the Montana State University Allen Yarnell Center for Student Success, the Montana State University Department of Political Science, and Townshend's Bozeman Teahouse.

View Event →
MTREP Bozeman Book Club - September
Sep
25
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Bozeman Book Club - September

How The Garcia Girls Lost Their Accent

by Julia Alvarez

Acclaimed writer Julia Alvarez’s brilliant and buoyant and beloved first novel gives voice to four sisters recounting their adventures growing up in two cultures. In this multiple prize-winning debut novel, the García sisters — Carla, Sandra, Yolanda, and Sofía—and their family must flee their home in the Dominican Republic after their father’s role in an attempt to overthrow a tyrannical dictator is discovered. They arrive in New York City in 1960 to a life far removed from their existence in the Caribbean. In the wild and wondrous and not always welcoming U.S.A., their parents try to hold on to their old ways, but the girls try find new lives: by forgetting their Spanish, by straightening their hair and wearing fringed bell bottoms. For them, it is at once liberating and excruciating to be caught between the old world and the new. How the García Girls Lost Their Accents sets the sisters free to tell their most intimate stories about how they came to be at home—and not at home—in America.

- Barnes and Noble

Here is a very nice interview with the author of our September Book Club selection - Julia Alvarez. Enjoy!

 Author Julia Alvarez

Author Julia Alvarez

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Oct
13
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

  • 136 2nd Street West Kalispell, MT, 59901 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Montana Racial Equity Project, hosted by Love Not Hate Flathead Valley, presents its popular workshop - Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use. This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged, marginalized, and oppressed people.

You’ll learn key terms, history, your racial and cultural lens, and communication methods. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever encountered.

*$80.00 per person. 
*Some half scholarships are available.
*Appropriate for age 15 and above.
*Bring your own lunch; coffee, tea, water, and snacks provided.
*Limited to 20 people. REGISTRATION DEADLINE is October 4th if not already fully booked. 
*NOTE - payments are non-refundable for any cancellations after October 4th if no one is available to fill the reserved slot.

Email: info@themtrep.org with any questions.

 One of our workshops earlier in 2018 with a full student capacity and one of our co-instructors.

One of our workshops earlier in 2018 with a full student capacity and one of our co-instructors.

DHW reg form. 18.10.13.jpg
View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Oct
27
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project once again presents its popular workshop - Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use. This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged, marginalized, and oppressed people.

You’ll learn key terms, history, your racial and cultural lens, and communication methods. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever encountered.

*$80.00 per person. Two half scholarships are available.

*Appropriate for age 15 and above.
*Lunch on own; coffee, water, and snacks provided.
*Limited to 20 people. REGISTRATION DEADLINE is Oct. 19th if not already fully booked. 

*Payment to PayPal.me/MTREP or by check mailed to the address on the registration sheet, below.
*NOTE - payments are non-refundable for any cancellations after October 19th if no one is available to fill the reserved slot.

Email: info@themtrep.org with any questions.

 Dismantling Hatred workshop earlier this year with a full class and one of our co-instructors.

Dismantling Hatred workshop earlier this year with a full class and one of our co-instructors.

DHW reg form. 18.10.27.jpg
View Event →

MTREP Bozeman Book Club - August
Aug
28
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Bozeman Book Club - August

Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? - And Other Conversations About Race

By Beverly Daniel Tatum

Beverly Daniel Tatum's 1997 book on race relations -- Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? -- has become a modern classic in college and high school classrooms, used to educate and prompt healthy discussions among young people about race. Tatum, a psychology scholar, stepped down as president of Spelman College in 2015. Her first major project after leaving administration was updating the book -- still relevant but with the original version missing the elections of Presidents Obama and Trump, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the police shootings that prompted the movement and galvanized many black youth. The new version of Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria? was released (Sep. 2017)

~ Inside Higher Ed

Walk into any racially mixed high school and you will see Black, White, and Latino youth clustered in their own groups. Is this self-segregation a problem to address or a coping strategy? Beverly Daniel Tatum, a renowned authority on the psychology of racism, argues that straight talk about our racial identities is essential if we are serious about enabling communication across racial and ethnic divides. These topics have only become more urgent as the national conversation about race is increasingly acrimonious. This fully revised edition is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the dynamics of race in America.

~ Amazon

Check out this 58-minute video interview with the author about this book and its genesis.

2017.11.30_Beverly_Tatum and book cover.jpg
View Event →
MTREP Bozeman Book Club - July
Jul
24
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Bozeman Book Club - July

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism

by Robin DiAngelo

DiAngelo (What Does It Mean to Be White?), a race scholar and professional diversity trainer, delivers a thoughtful, instructive, and comprehensive book on challenging racism by understanding and working against what she terms “white fragility,” the reaction in which white people feel offended or attacked when the topic of racism arises. She explains that the book is primarily intended for white audiences to aid in “building our stamina” for tolerating these discussions in order to challenge racism. DiAngelo brings together personal experiences, extensive research, and real-world examples—including missteps she herself has made, such as joking inappropriately about a black colleague’s hair—to demonstrate how entrenched racism remains a societal norm in institutions and white people’s mindsets, including supposedly “colorblind” thinking and behavior. Her analysis effectively challenges the widespread notion that “only intentionally mean people can participate in racism”; rather, she explains, racism is “deeply embedded in the fabric of our society.” She ends with a step-by-step blueprint for confronting and dismantling one’s own white fragility to try to “interrupt” racism. This slim book is impressive in its scope and complexity; DiAngelo provides a powerful lens for examining, and practical tools for grappling with, racism today.

~ Publishers Weekly

Deconstructing White Privilege with Dr. Robin DiAngelo, 22-minute video

author and book cover.jpg
View Event →
2018 - 2019 Teen Peer-to-Peer Leadership Program
Jul
14
to Jul 16

2018 - 2019 Teen Peer-to-Peer Leadership Program

  • American Explorers Basecamp (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

ADVOCATE TO ACTIVATE!

The Montana Racial Equity Project is accepting applications for our first Teen Peer-to-Peer Leadership Program for Montana teens ages 15 through 18. The Program - Advocate to Activate! - is an eleven (11) month long commitment.

Advocate to Activate! is geared towards teens who are established or up-and-coming leaders in their respective communities who want to help reduce the expression of prejudice, bigotry, and racism towards people of color, LGBTQIA, and religious minorities. 

Advocate to Activate! will kick-off with a two and one-half day retreat July 14, 15, and 16, 2018 at American Explorer’s Basecamp in the Paradise Valley between Livingston and Gardiner, Montana. The retreat is the start of an eleven-month program and is for teens 15 through 18 years of age who are in high school in Montana or are rising college students in Montana. 

The retreat will also include an exciting and challenging ropes course under the guidance of a professional expert. The entire Leadership retreat and program is no cost to participants due to generous grant funding from the Montana Community Foundation and the Pride Foundation.

Deadline for Applications is June 21, 2018. We suggest no delays as we will only accept eight to 10 students. Please see the brochure, below, to apply.

FAQs

When is the kick-off retreat?  July 14 through 16, 2018

Pick up time: Saturday, July 14th @ 9am, Bozeman (specific location TBA)

Drop off time: Monday, July 16th @ 4pm, Bozeman (specific location TBA)

Where will the retreat be held? The Arthur M. Blank Foundation has granted us use of the delightful American Explorers Base Camp located in the Paradise Valley, between Emigrant and Gardiner, MT. It is very close to the private Mountain Sky Guest Ranch.

How and where will the monthly meetings be held?  Monthly meetings will be held virtually and after the initial retreat. The days and times will be decided on by the group in order to make sure that every participant can make the meetings at the same time.

What if I don’t have regular access to a computer or the internet?  We will make sure that the days and time of the monthly meetings occur at a time that you do have access to both.

Who qualifies to be accepted into the Teen Program?  Teens 15 through 18 years who live anywhere in Montana, including reservations. If a rising college freshman, we require that the participant be attending a college/university within Montana. As the mission of MTREP is to advocate equity and justice for historically marginalized, disenfranchised, and oppressed humans, we are particularly committed to a group representing racial diversity, sexual orientation, gender non-conformity, and the religious minorities of Jewish and Muslim. Yes, teens identifying as white, straight, and cis-gender are encouraged to apply, too!

What are some advantages in participating in this program of which I may not have thought?  Besides being a wonderful leadership and growth opportunity that helps one’s fellow humans, acceptance to and participation in this program will be LOVED by college admissions officers!
You will learn, practice, and hone skills that will carry you well through life – communication skills, diplomacy, planning, community organizing, and much more.

What kind of projects the students will be taking on for the year?  They will be projects of their own choosing with advice and counsel from Program staff. Individual project (s) plus a common one. The focus will be on communication and advocacy with peers about the issues they learned about and activating others to advocate as well

More Questions? Call us! (406) 620-6824 or email info@themtrep.org

MTREP ATA brochure-application, 2018 p1.jpg
MTREP ATA brochure-application p2, 2018.jpg

 

 

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More
Jun
26
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Book Club - Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More

By Janet Mock

In her profound and courageous New York Times bestseller, Janet Mock establishes herself as a resounding and inspirational voice for the transgender community—and anyone fighting to define themselves on their own terms.

With unflinching honesty and moving prose, Janet Mock relays her experiences of growing up young, multiracial, poor, and trans in America, offering readers accessible language while imparting vital insight about the unique challenges and vulnerabilities of a marginalized and misunderstood population. Though undoubtedly an account of one woman’s quest for self at all costs, Redefining Realness is a powerful vision of possibility and self-realization, pushing us all toward greater acceptance of one another—and of ourselves—showing as never before how to be unapologetic and real.

~Amazon.com

Redefining Realness book cover.jpg
View Event →
YWCA of Missoula / MTREP Book Club - So You Want To Talk About Race
Jun
21
6:00 PM18:00

YWCA of Missoula / MTREP Book Club - So You Want To Talk About Race

So You Want To Talk About Race

by Ijeomo Oluo

By request, we present our monthly Book Club in Missoula! The fabulous YWCA Missoula has seen the demand and volunteered to step up to the plate in partnership with The Montana Racial Equity Project Book Club. JOIN US!
-------------------------------------------
In this breakout book, Ijeoma Oluo explores the complex reality of today's racial landscape--from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement--offering straightforward clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide

(It is) a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions (that many) readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.

Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystalize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity. 

~Amazon.com

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Jun
2
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project once again presents its popular workshop - Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use. This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged, marginalized, and oppressed people.

You’ll learn key terms, history, your racial and cultural lens, and communication methods. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever encountered.

$60.00 per person. Appropriate for age 15 and above.

Bring your own lunch; coffee, tea, water, and snacks provided.

One full and one half scholarship available (all claimed at this time.)

Limited to 20 people. REGISTRATION DEADLINE is May 11 if not already fully booked.

Email: info@themtrep.org with any questions.

DHW 18.02.10 pic 2.jpg
DHW reg form. 18.06.02.jpg
View Event →
MTREP Book Club - Blood on the Marias: The Baker Massacre
May
22
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Book Club - Blood on the Marias: The Baker Massacre

by Paul R. Wylie

On the morning of January 23, 1870, troops of the 2nd U.S. Cavalry attacked a Piegan Indian village on the Marias River in Montana Territory, killing many more than the army’s count of 173, most of them women, children, and old men. The village was afflicted with smallpox. Worse, it was the wrong encampment. Intended as a retaliation against Mountain Chief’s renegade band, the massacre sparked public outrage when news sources revealed that the battalion had attacked Heavy Runner’s innocent village—and that guides had told its inebriated commander, Major Eugene Baker, he was on the wrong trail, but he struck anyway. Remembered as one of the most heinous incidents of the Indian Wars, the Baker Massacre has often been overshadowed by the better-known Battle of the Little Bighorn and has never received full treatment until now.

Author Paul R. Wylie plumbs the history of Euro-American involvement with the Piegans, who were members of the Blackfeet Confederacy. His research shows the tribe was trading furs for whiskey with the Hudson’s Bay Company before Meriwether Lewis encountered them in 1806. As American fur traders and trappers moved into the region, the U.S. government soon followed, making treaties it did not honor. When the gold rush started in the 1860s and the U.S. Army arrived, pressure from Montana citizens to control the Piegans and make the territory safe led Generals William Tecumseh Sherman and Philip H. Sheridan to send Baker and the 2nd Cavalry, with tragic consequences. Although these generals sought to dictate press coverage thereafter, news of the cruelty of the killings appeared in the New York Times, which called the massacre “a more shocking affair than the sacking of Black Kettle’s camp on the Washita” two years earlier.

While other scholars have written about the Baker Massacre in related contexts, Blood on the Marias gives this infamous event the definitive treatment it deserves. Baker’s inept command lit the spark of violence, but decades of tension between Piegans and whites set the stage for a brutal and too-often-forgotten incident.

author, book cover.jpg
View Event →
MTREP Book Club - So You Want to Talk About Race
Apr
24
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Book Club - So You Want to Talk About Race

So You Want to Talk About Race

by Ijeoma Oluo

In this breakout book, Ijeoma Oluo explores the complex reality of today's racial landscape--from white privilege and police brutality to systemic discrimination and the Black Lives Matter movement--offering straightforward clarity that readers need to contribute to the dismantling of the racial divide

(It is) a contemporary, accessible take on the racial landscape in America, addressing head-on such issues as privilege, police brutality, intersectionality, micro-aggressions, the Black Lives Matter movement, and the "N" word. Perfectly positioned to bridge the gap between people of color and white Americans struggling with race complexities, Oluo answers the questions (that many) readers don't dare ask, and explains the concepts that continue to elude everyday Americans.

Oluo is an exceptional writer with a rare ability to be straightforward, funny, and effective in her coverage of sensitive, hyper-charged issues in America. Her messages are passionate but finely tuned, and crystallize ideas that would otherwise be vague by empowering them with aha-moment clarity.

~Amazon.com

ijeoma-oluo.jpg
View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Apr
14
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project once again presents its popular workshop - Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use. This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged, marginalized, and oppressed people.

You’ll learn key terms, history, your racial and cultural lens, and communication methods. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever encountered.

$60.00 per person. Appropriate for age 15 and above.

Bring your own lunch; coffee, tea, water, and snacks provided.

One full and one half scholarship available (all claimed at this time.)

Limited to 20 people. REGISTRATION DEADLINE is April 7 if not already fully booked.

Email: info@themtrep.org with any questions.

Dismantling Hatred reg form.jpg
View Event →
Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpowers
Mar
27
6:30 PM18:30

Eloquent Rage: A Black Feminist Discovers Her Superpowers

by Dr. Brittney Cooper

A professor explores the ways “sexism, and racism, and classism work together to fuck shit up for everybody” and how feminism can begin undoing the damage.

“We [black women] are told we are irrational, crazy, out of touch, entitled, disruptive and not team players,” writes Cooper (Women and Gender Studies, Africana Studies/Rutgers Univ.). But as her feminist foremother Audre Lorde once remarked, this anger was not only legitimate; it was also “a powerful source of energy serving progress and change.” Here, Cooper brings together essays tracing her evolution as a feminist while giving voice to the political (out)rage seething within. The author begins by detailing the difficult journey that led her to “disidentify with [the] whiteness” of mainstream feminism and learn to embrace her “particular Black girl magic.” Her quest for political authenticity meant fighting with white women over racism and black men over sexism. Participating in these separate battles did not blind her to the need for alliances with both groups, however; they only made her more aware of the need for creating solidarity across communities to topple patriarchy. Cooper’s feminist journey also forced her to shed cultural “baggage”—such as the racism of a white society that questioned her movements on American streets and the sexism of black society that sought to control her sexuality through the church—that limited her passage through the world. Once uncovered and focused, however, the rage that inevitably comes from such injustices is of tremendous benefit to all. Cooper points to tennis star Serena Williams, former first lady Michelle Obama, and singer Beyoncé as contemporary black feminist role models. By learning how to channel their rage in their areas of endeavor, they have earned game-changing respect that has transcended race and gender. Sharp and always humane, Cooper’s book suggests important ways in which feminism needs to evolve for the betterment not just of black women, but society as a whole.

A timely and provocative book that shows “what you build is infinitely more important than what you tear down.”

(Kirkus Reviews)

See also this recent interview with the author. And an insightful TED Talk she delivered, "The Racial Politics of Time. 

book cover and author pic.png
View Event →
MTREP Volunteer Community Meeting
Mar
22
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Volunteer Community Meeting

All current and prospective MTREP volunteers are invited to our community meeting on Thursday, March 22, 6:30 PM - 7:45 PM at the Bozeman Public Library in the Small Community Meeting Room. 

We'll be talking about what's coming up, community organizer training specific to our mission, and the many different ways in which YOU can help us work towards ending racism, bigotry, and prejudice. Don't miss it! Rsvp to this meeting.

Any questions? Please contact hannah.mtrep@gmail.com

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America
Feb
27
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Book Club - Stamped from the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

By Ibram X. Kendi

***National Book Award Winner for non-fiction, 2016; New York Times and Washington Post best-seller

Some Americans cling desperately to the myth that we are living in a post-racial society, that the election of the first Black president spelled the doom of racism. In fact, racist thought is alive and well in America--more sophisticated and more insidious than ever. And as award-winning historian Ibram X. Kendi argues in Stamped from the Beginning, if we have any hope of grappling with this stark reality, we must first understand how racist ideas were developed, disseminated, and enshrined in American society.


In this deeply researched and fast-moving narrative, Kendi chronicles the entire story of anti-Black racist ideas and their staggering power over the course of American history. Stamped from the Beginning uses the life stories of five major American intellectuals to offer a window into the contentious debates between assimilationists and segregationists and between racists and antiracists. From Puritan minister Cotton Mather to Thomas Jefferson, from fiery abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison to brilliant scholar W.E.B. Du Bois to legendary anti-prison activist Angela Davis, Kendi shows how and why some of our leading proslavery and pro-civil rights thinkers have challenged or helped cement racist ideas in America.

Contrary to popular conceptions, racist ideas did not arise from ignorance or hatred. Instead, they were devised and honed by some of the most brilliant minds of each era. These intellectuals used their brilliance to justify and rationalize deeply entrenched discriminatory policies and the nation's racial disparities in everything from wealth to health. And while racist ideas are easily produced and easily consumed, they can also be discredited. In shedding much-needed light on the murky history of racist ideas, Stamped from the Beginning offers us the tools we need to expose them--and in the process, gives us reason to hope.

Interview with the author by PBS

Stamped-from-the-Beginning-400x250.png
View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Feb
10
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project once again presents its popular signature workshop - Dismantling Hatred. This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged and marginalized peoples.

You’ll learn key terms, history, your racial and cultural lens, and communication methods. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever encountered.

$60.00 per person. Appropriate for age 15 and above.

Bring your own lunch; coffee, tea, water, and snacks provided.

One full and one half scholarship available

Limited to 20 people. REGISTRATION DEADLINE is Feb. 5

Email: info@themtrep.org for registration information.

Dismantling Hatred reg form.jpg
View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Jan
27
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

The Montana Racial Equity Project once again presents its popular signature workshop - Dismantling Hatred. This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged and marginalized peoples.

You’ll learn key terms, history, your racial and cultural lens, and communication methods. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever encountered.

$60.00 per person. Appropriate for age 15 and above.

Bring your own lunch; coffee, tea, water, and snacks provided.

One full and one half scholarship available

Limited to 20 people. REGISTRATION DEADLINE is Feb. 5
Email: info@themtrep.org for any additional information needed.

Dismantling Hatred reg form.jpg
View Event →
MTREP Book Club - January 23, 2018
Jan
23
6:30 PM18:30

MTREP Book Club - January 23, 2018

WE WERE EIGHT YEARS IN POWER - An American Tragedy

by Ta-Nehisi Coates

“We were eight years in power” was the lament of Reconstruction-era black politicians as the American experiment in multiracial democracy ended with the return of white supremacist rule in the South. In this sweeping collection of new and selected essays, Ta-Nehisi Coates explores the tragic echoes of that history in our own time: the unprecedented election of a black president followed by a vicious backlash that fueled the election of the man Coates argues is America’s “first white president.”

But the story of these present-day eight years is not just about presidential politics. This book also examines the new voices, ideas, and movements for justice that emerged over this period—and the effects of the persistent, haunting shadow of our nation’s old and unreconciled history. Coates powerfully examines the events of the Obama era from his intimate and revealing perspective—the point of view of a young writer who begins the journey in an unemployment office in Harlem and ends it in the Oval Office, interviewing a president.

We Were Eight Years in Power features Coates’s iconic essays first published in The Atlantic, including “Fear of a Black President,” “The Case for Reparations,” and “The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration,” along with eight fresh essays that revisit each year of the Obama administration through Coates’s own experiences, observations, and intellectual development, capped by a bracingly original assessment of the election that fully illuminated the tragedy of the Obama era. We Were Eight Years in Power is a vital account of modern America, from one of the definitive voices of this historic moment.

Interview with Ta Nehisi Coates: "We Were Eight Years in Power: An American Tragedy" on 10/18/17

View Event →
Skin in the Game: Anti-Semitism and the Heart of White Nationalism
Jan
16
5:15 PM17:15

Skin in the Game: Anti-Semitism and the Heart of White Nationalism

  • The Emerson Center for the Arts and Culture (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

A Conversation with Eric Ward
featuring Bozeman Community Activist Interviews by Judith Heilman & Rabbi Ed Stafman

This program is a 2018 Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Event and is free to the public (though donations will be heartily accepted!)

Sponsored by The Montana Human Rights Network, The Montana Racial Equity Project, Congregation Beth Shalom (Bozeman), MSU Diversity & Inclusion Student Commons, St. James Episcopal Church (Bozeman), and the Gallatin Valley Interfaith Association. 

5:15 PM Reception | 6:00 PM Program | 7:15 PM Documentary, "Oklahoma City"

FREE TO THE PUBLIC

bozeman mlk.jpg
View Event →
MTREP Book Club - November 28, 2017
Nov
28
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - November 28, 2017

All the Real Indians Died Off

By Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker

"All the Real Indians Died Off" unpacks the twenty-one most common myths and misconceptions about Native Americans

In this enlightening book, scholars and activists Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker tackle a wide range of myths about Native American culture and history that have misinformed generations. Tracing how these ideas evolved, and drawing from history, the authors disrupt long-held and enduring myths such as:

“Columbus Discovered America”
“Thanksgiving Proves the Indians Welcomed Pilgrims”
“Indians Were Savage and Warlike”
“Europeans Brought Civilization to Backward Indians”
“The United States Did Not Have a Policy of Genocide”
“Sports Mascots Honor Native Americans”
“Most Indians Are on Government Welfare”
“Indian Casinos Make Them All Rich”
“Indians Are Naturally Predisposed to Alcohol”

Each chapter deftly shows how these myths are rooted in the fears and prejudice of European settlers and in the larger political agendas of a settler state aimed at acquiring Indigenous land and tied to narratives of erasure and disappearance. Accessibly written and revelatory, “All the Real Indians Died Off” challenges readers to rethink what they have been taught about Native Americans and history.

View this one-hour YouTube video with the authors filmed in Washington D.C. late December 2016

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - October 24, 2017
Oct
24
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - October 24, 2017

Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors

By Carolyn Finney, PhD

Why are African Americans so underrepresented when it comes to interest in nature, outdoor recreation, and environmentalism? In this thought-provoking study, Carolyn Finney looks beyond the discourse of the environmental justice movement to examine how the natural environment has been understood, commodified, and represented by both white and black Americans. Bridging the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography, Finney argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces. 

Drawing on a variety of sources from film, literature, and popular culture, and analyzing different historical moments, including the establishment of the Wilderness Act in 1964 and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Finney reveals the perceived and real ways in which nature and the environment are racialized in America. Looking toward the future, she also highlights the work of African Americans who are opening doors to greater participation in environmental and conservation concerns.

 The Montana State University Wallace Stegner Lecture Series is proud to present Dr. Carolyn Finney as the Fall 2017 Stegner Lecturer. Dr. Finney will speak on "The Long Way Home: All Things Green and the Possibility of Us." The event at The Ellen Theatre in Bozeman is free and open to the public; a reception will follow the lecture. Entrace is free but seats must be secured in advance at  this link.

The Montana State University Wallace Stegner Lecture Series is proud to present Dr. Carolyn Finney as the Fall 2017 Stegner Lecturer. Dr. Finney will speak on "The Long Way Home: All Things Green and the Possibility of Us." The event at The Ellen Theatre in Bozeman is free and open to the public; a reception will follow the lecture. Entrace is free but seats must be secured in advance at this link.

Dr. Carolyn Finney talks about her book—Black Faces, White Spaces: Reimagining the Relationship of African Americans to the Great Outdoors. in this presentation for WBGH (Boston) in April 2015. Her work bridges the fields of environmental history, cultural studies, critical race studies, and geography. She argues that the legacies of slavery, Jim Crow, and racial violence have shaped cultural understandings of the "great outdoors" and determined who should and can have access to natural spaces.

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use
Oct
7
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills and Strategies You Can Use

This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged and marginalized peoples.

You will gain awareness of key terms, and history, and your cultural lens. You'll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry, and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

WHEN |

Saturday, October 7, 2017

9:00am - 3:00pm

WHERE |

C'mon Inn

6139 E Valley Center Rd

Bozeman, MT

COST |

$56.00 provided

Bring your own lunch, snacks provided

One full and one half scholarship available

Limited to 20 people

 

Email: info@themtrep.org to enroll

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - September 26, 2017
Sep
26
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - September 26, 2017

  • Gallatin Valley Land Trust - Conference Room (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

THE HATE YOU GIVE

By Angie Thomas

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w1gNYFka1-s&t=1464s

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.

Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil’s name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does—or does not—say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

-description courtesy of Amazon.com

View Event →
Race in Montana - A Community Forum
Sep
15
8:15 AM08:15

Race in Montana - A Community Forum

The Montana Racial Equity Project (MTREP) invites you to a free and open forum to explore many of the facets of racial equity and justice in Montana.

Experts and community members will participate as panelists. Following each panel, the audience is encouraged to engage in community dialogue and discuss possible solutions to problematic issues raised. 
We coexist with thousands of different backgrounds, heritages, cultures, and mindsets. Being able to see into the lives of those who are different from us empowers our community to be more inclusive and supportive towards one another. MTREP's Race in Montana Community Forum does just that, by promoting productive conversation and opening individual's minds to the (often harsh) realities of their neighbors and communities.

This Forum is funded in part by a grant from Humanities Montana.

Schedule (subject to change)
8:15am - 8:45am Registration Open - Bozeman Public Library

  • 8:45 - 9am: Greeting/Acknowledgements
  • 9-9:45: 1st panel Sovereign Nations yet Wards of the Government - Panelists: Meg Singer, Indigenous Justice Outreach Coordinator, ACLU-MT; Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University; Moderator, Marci McLean - Pollock, Executive Director, Western Native Voice and Board Member of MTREP
  • 10-10:45: 2nd panel Unpacking Microaggressions - Panelists: Asst. Prof. Anna Elliott, Counseling Department, Montana State University; Kristin Barker, co-founder, White Awake; Moderator, Asst. Prof. Bryce Hughes, Education Dept., Montana State University
  • 11-11:45: 3rd panel Cultural Appropriation - Panelists: Meg Singer, Indigenous Justice Outreach Coordinator, ACLU-MT; Paul S. John, Board Chair of MTREP, Aspen Hougen, Volunteer and Co-Instructor of Dismantling Hatred Workshop (MTREP); Moderator, Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University

11:50 to 12:50pm Lunch on own
12:50pm Doors open/Registration, Bozeman Public Library

  • 1-1:45: 4th panel Racial & Cultural Bias in Marketing & Advertising (incl ableism) - Panelists: LaNada Peppers, Staff Writer at Montana Native News Project, Assoc. Prof. Meta Newhouse, Montana State University School of Art and Founding Director of DSEL (the Design Sandbox of Engaged Learning), Vasu Sojitra, Adaptive Sports Director, Eagle Mount and extreme athlete; Moderator: Judith Heilman, Executive Director of MTREP
  • 2-245: 5th panel White Privilege and White Fragility - Panelists: Kristin Barker, Co-Founder of White Awake; Sara Rushing, PhD, Political Science Dept at Montana State University; Moderator, Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University
  • 3-3:45: 6th panel Sit Down! Guidance for White Activists - Panelists: The Board of The Montana Racial Equity Project; Moderator, Sara Rushing, PhD, Political Science Dept at Montana State University
  • 4pm-4:30pm: 7th panel Stand up! Tips for Racial Justice/ Community Organizing - Panelists: SK Rossi, Advocacy and Policy Director, ACLU-Montana; Sara Howell, Exec. Director, Montana Women Vote; Moderator: Paul S. John, Board President, MTREP
  • 4:30-4:45pm Reflections on the day

4:45pm to 7pm Dinner on own
7pm Doors open at The Hager Auditorium, Museum of the Rockies

  • 7:30-9:00 "The Bumpy Road to a Positive White Identity" followed by a moderated Q & A. - Panelists: Kristin Barker, co-founder, White Awake; Judith Heilman, Exec. Director, The Montana Racial Equity Project; Moderator, Prof. Franke Wilmer, Political Science Dept. Chair, Montana State University.

As our culture confronts our nation’s legacy of racism and the ways it persists, it’s incumbent upon those who identify as white to understand racial dynamics and be open to others’ perspectives. Yet often we feel attacked and blamed, as if others see us as guilty or privileged in ways we aren’t or can’t relate to. 

In this compelling evening, Kristin Barker, co-founder of White Awake (joined by Judith Heilman, Exec Dir of The Montana Racial Equity Project,) will present the common reactions and misgivings that white people have about racial equity and normalize the sometimes painful process of examining what it means for us. 

Our murky, unexplored feelings about being white often create a nervousness and hesitancy to speak and connect across racial lines. Many of us:
• Feel like we’re walking on egg shells, afraid we will say “the wrong thing” 
• Fear that we’ll unintentionally hurt someone and be seen as “racist”
• Feel defensive about what “White Privilege” might mean
• Support “Black Lives Matter” in theory but fear it in practice
• Sense that racial equity means that something is being taken away from “us”
• Feel bad about the legacy of racism, but don’t feel we can do anything about it
• Feel somehow guilty by association for something (our skin) over which we had no control
• Feel like there are emerging double standards and “reverse racism”

Working with these common reactions to the emerging racial dialogue is an important process of growth in understanding, in increasing our ability to address issues of race without shame, anger, undue guilt or defensiveness.

The Library is handicapped accessible, is equipped with bathrooms for all and free wi-fi, and has an on-site coffee shop. The Hager Auditorium is also handicapped accessible.

View Event →
Just Mercy - Montana
Aug
30
11:30 AM11:30

Just Mercy - Montana

The Montana Racial Equity Project in partnership with the Bozeman Public Library presents an open forum to discuss issues featured in the work of Bryan Stevenson, Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative, and author of Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption. The issues are: Aiding the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned, specifically – the elimination of excessive and unfair sentencing, the exoneration of innocent death row prisoners, elimination of the abuse of the incarcerated and the mentally ill and aiding children prosecuted as adults.

| WHO |
Judith Heilman - Executive Director, Montana Racial Equity Project
Caitlin Borgmann – Executive Director, ACLU Montana
Rabbi Ed Stafman - former Defense Attorney
Larry Mansch - Legal and Clinic Director, The Montana Innocence Project
Moderator: Professor Franke Wilmer, Department Chair, Political Science, Montana State University

| WHERE |
Bozeman Public Library Large Community Meeting Room, 626 E. Main St., Bozeman, MT 59715

| WHEN |
Wednesday, August 30th
Doors open 11:00am, event concludes 1:30pm

| COST |
Free to the public

17.08.30 Just Mercy-Montana flyer, FINAL.jpg
View Event →
MTREP Book Club - August 29, 2017
Aug
29
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - August 29, 2017

JUST MERCY

By Bryan Stevenson (MSU Convocation Speaker, 2017)

#1 New York Times Bestseller | Named one of the Best Books of the Year by The New York Times • The Washington Post • The Boston Globe • The Seattle Times • Esquire • Time

A powerful true story about the potential for mercy to redeem us, and a clarion call to fix our broken system of justice—from one of the most brilliant and influential lawyers of our time
 
Bryan Stevenson was a young lawyer when he founded the Equal Justice Initiative, a legal practice dedicated to defending those most desperate and in need: the poor, the wrongly condemned, and women and children trapped in the farthest reaches of our criminal justice system. One of his first cases was that of Walter McMillian, a young man who was sentenced to die for a notorious murder he insisted he didn’t commit. The case drew Bryan into a tangle of conspiracy, political machination, and legal brinksmanship—and transformed his understanding of mercy and justice forever.
 
Just Mercy is at once an unforgettable account of an idealistic, gifted young lawyer’s coming of age, a moving window into the lives of those he has defended, and an inspiring argument for compassion in the pursuit of true justice.

- Description courtesy of Amazon.com

Check out this 38 minute conversation with Mr. Stevenson on NPR's Fresh Air.

Also view this interview with Mr. Stevenson on August 15, 2017 regarding the Charlottesville violence, courtesy of CNN.

View Event →
Peace Through Diversity
Jul
29
10:00 AM10:00

Peace Through Diversity

Understand how awareness of diversity can create a culture of peace and bring greater harmony to our community and the world.

Shadmani M. Amin -- Muslim Community

Karen DeCotis -- Bozeman Dharma Center

Karen deVries, PhD  -- Gender Studies

Carly Siefert -- The Montana Racial Equity Project

Glover Wagner -- Pilgrim Congregational Church

Franke Wilmer -- Member, Temple Beth Shalom

Each speaker will give a 5 minute talk about what peace means to them and how it can be achieved.

Each talk will be followed by 8 minutes of silent contemplation of the words just heard and what they mean to you.

Refresh Your Mind.     Open Your Heart.     Welcome Diversity.

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - July 25, 2017
Jul
25
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - July 25, 2017

SIGNS PRECEDING THE END OF THE WORLD

By Yuri Herrrra, translated into English by Lisa Dillman

Signs Preceding the End of the World is one of the most arresting novels to be published in Spanish in the last ten years. Yuri Herrera does not simply write about the border between Mexico and the United States and those who cross it. He explores the crossings and translations people make in their minds and language as they move from one country to another, especially when there’s no going back.

Traversing this lonely territory is Makina, a young woman who knows only too well how to survive in a violent, macho world. Leaving behind her life in Mexico to search for her brother, she is smuggled into the USA carrying a pair of secret messages – one from her mother and one from the Mexican underworld.

Text courtesy of Amazon.com

NOTE: This book discussion will be led by Dr. Sara Rushing, Assistant Professor of Political Science at Montana State University.

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - June 27, 2017
Jun
27
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - June 27, 2017

TEARS WE CANNOT STOP: A Sermon to White America

by Michael Eric Dyson

“One of the most frank and searing discussions on race ... a deeply serious, urgent book, which should take its place in the tradition of Baldwin's The Fire Next Time and King's Why We Can't Wait." ―The New York Times Book Review

Toni Morrison hails Tears We Cannot Stop as "Elegantly written and powerful in several areas: moving personal recollections; profound cultural analysis; and guidance for moral redemption. A work to relish." 

Stephen King says: "Here’s a sermon that’s as fierce as it is lucid…If you’re black, you’ll feel a spark of recognition in every paragraph. If you’re white, Dyson tells you what you need to know―what this white man needed to know, at least. This is a major achievement. I read it and said amen."

Short, emotional, literary, powerful―Tears We Cannot Stop is the book that all Americans who care about the current and long-burning crisis in race relations will want to read.

As the country grapples with racist division at a level not seen since the 1960s, one man's voice soars above the rest with conviction and compassion. In his 2016 New York Times op-ed piece "Death in Black and White," Michael Eric Dyson moved a nation. Now he continues to speak out in Tears We Cannot Stop―a provocative and deeply personal call for change. Dyson argues that if we are to make real racial progress we must face difficult truths, including being honest about how black grievance has been ignored, dismissed, or discounted.

"The time is at hand for reckoning with the past, recognizing the truth of the present, and moving together to redeem the nation for our future. If we don't act now, if you don't address race immediately, there very well may be no future."

~ Descripition courtesy Amazon.com

View Event →
PIE & ICE CREAM FUNDRAISER!
Jun
7
6:30 PM18:30

PIE & ICE CREAM FUNDRAISER!

Join us in Bozeman to celebrate and support Montana Human Rights Network and The Montana Racial Equity Project! 

Address is not publicly posted. Please RSVP to kylie@mhrn for event address.

Come hear about the work of each organization, enjoy pie and home-made gourmet ice cream, and make a donation to support two great organizations working to promote human rights and racial equity in Montana.

If you can’t make it to this event but would like to make a donation to support The Montana Racial Equity Project, please go to our homepage (the Donate button is on the top left of our home page) or send a check to: PO Box 11885, Bozeman, MT 59719. Likewise, donations to the Montana Human Rights Network can be made by visiting the network's website or mailing donations to: PO Box 1509, Helena, MT 59624.

Thank you!

View Event →
Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use
Jun
3
9:00 AM09:00

Dismantling Hatred - Skills & Strategies You Can Use

This workshop will enable you to develop skills and strategies to dismantle hatred towards historically disadvantaged and marginalized peoples.

You will gain awareness of key terms, and history, and your cultural lens. You’ll also develop the ability and equanimity to recognize and deal with racism, bigotry and prejudice whenever you encounter it.

  • Bring Your Own Lunch. Drinks, including coffee and herbal teas will be provided.
  • The workshop will be conducted in the classroom of Shining Mountains Lutheran Church.

NOTE: The Montana Racial Equity Project is not affiliated with Shining Mountains Lutheran Church or any other religious institution.

Please complete the registration form (below) and mail it back to us with your payment (address at the bottom of the form) or scan and email it back to us at info@themtrep.org. Payment may be made by using our PayPal DONATE button at the top left of our home page.

Thank you!

View Event →
MTREP Book Club - May 30
May
30
7:30 PM19:30

MTREP Book Club - May 30

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis

by J.D. Vance

Hillbilly Elegy is a passionate and personal analysis of a culture in crisis—that of white working-class Americans. The decline of this group, a demographic of our country that has been slowly disintegrating over forty years, has been reported on with growing frequency and alarm, but has never before been written about as searingly from the inside. J. D. Vance tells the true story of what a social, regional, and class decline feels like when you were born with it hung around your neck.

The Vance family story begins hopefully in postwar America. J. D.’s grandparents were “dirt poor and in love,” and moved north from Kentucky’s Appalachia region to Ohio in the hopes of escaping the dreadful poverty around them. They raised a middle-class family, and eventually their grandchild (the author) would graduate from Yale Law School, a conventional marker of their success in achieving generational upward mobility.

But as the family saga of Hillbilly Elegy plays out, we learn that this is only the short, superficial version. Vance’s grandparents, aunt, uncle, sister, and, most of all, his mother, struggled profoundly with the demands of their new middle-class life, and were never able to fully escape the legacy of abuse, alcoholism, poverty, and trauma so characteristic of their part of America. Vance piercingly shows how he himself still carries around the demons of their chaotic family history.

A deeply moving memoir with its share of humor and vividly colorful figures, Hillbilly Elegy is the story of how upward mobility really feels. And it is an urgent and troubling meditation on the loss of the American dream for a large segment of this country.

View Event →